My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf

My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf, is a retrospective psychoanalysis of the life and death of Virginia Woolf by the iconoclastic psychiatrist Thomas Szasz. Szasz presents his views on Virginia Woolf's life and suicide as a counterbalance to the prevailing view that she was a genius writer tormented by mental … Continue reading My Madness Saved Me: The Madness and Marriage of Virginia Woolf

Recollections of a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: The Case of “Prisoner K”

In a rare psychoanalytic case history, Thomas Szasz presents Recollections of a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: The Case of "Prisoner 'K'". In it, Szasz gives us an opportunity to see how he actually practiced psychotherapy. Szasz mentions in the first pages that his practice has since changed, but that he views the case as an adequate case … Continue reading Recollections of a Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy: The Case of “Prisoner K”

The Economics of Szasz: Preferences, Constraints, and Mental Illness

In the paper, The Economics of Szasz: Preferences, Constraints, and Mental Illness, Bryan Caplan summarizes Thomas Szasz’s views on mental illness and translates them into the language of economics. Caplan is an economist with a wide variety of interests. He is an interesting writer, thinker, and regularly provokes conversation on Twitter and his blog. Caplan won … Continue reading The Economics of Szasz: Preferences, Constraints, and Mental Illness

Practicing Thomas Szasz: Continuing the Work of the Philosopher of Liberty

The book, Practicing Thomas Szasz: Continuing the Work of the Philosopher of Liberty, has little to do with practicing Thomas Szasz. Instead, the author John Breeding tries to fit Szasz into his own version of what he thinks Szasz represents - a raised fist to psychiatry. Unfortunately, Breeding does not understand Szasz and therefore cannot … Continue reading Practicing Thomas Szasz: Continuing the Work of the Philosopher of Liberty

Our Right To Drugs: The Case for a Free Market

Does a person have a right to take drugs, grow plants, and self-medicate in the privacy of their own home? In the book, Our Right to Drugs: The Case for a Free Market, Thomas Szasz points out obvious: people have taken drugs since time immemorial, they take drugs to make themselves feel better, induce unusual … Continue reading Our Right To Drugs: The Case for a Free Market